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Monday, 22 Jan 2018
Displaying items by tag: camera

HDC-TM300EC-K

Published in Cameras

The TM300 has essentially the same optics and sensor as the HS300. There's a Leica Dicomar lens and a trio of 1/4.1in CMOS sensors, each with a gross 3.05-megapixels. So far, so similar. However, there are a few important differences. Previously, Panasonic has offered two options with its camcorders - SD models which use SDHC flash memory cards, and HS models with hard disks as well. The new TM models have flash memory built in. With the TM300, this is 32GB. So that's quite a bit less than the 120GB hard disk in the HS300, but still enough for over four hours of footage even at the top quality setting, which records 1,920 x 1,080 Full HD at 17Mbits/sec. There's also an SDHC card slot available if you need a little more.

 

Thanks to the lack of an internal hard disk, the TM300 is 85g lighter than the HS300 and Panasonic has been able to redesign the chassis slightly too. The base dimensions are almost identical, but the handgrip side has a smoother, rounder contour which is a little easier to hold. The wheel for switching the camcorder on into video, camera or playback mode has been moved to the side, and can now be operated one-handed with your thumb. But more significantly, the zoom-telephoto rocker is now on the top of the main body, allowing it to be a much more sensible size.


Presumably because of the relocation of this rocker, there is no accessory shoe on top of the body. Fortunately, Panasonic still sees this as an important option and hasn't left it off entirely. Sliding a door on the side reveals a bracket, into which can be slotted an adapter that comes included in the box. This provides a standard accessory shoe. The door then slides back to neaten things up. Given the slightly annoying flap covering the accessory shoe on the HS300, we actually like this aspect of the TM300 better. On the one hand, you will have to remember this adapter or leave it attached, if you want to use it on a shoot. But if you don't, you can leave it behind and have a sleeker camcorder. Either way, minijacks are ready for headphone and external microphone near the accessory shoe location.

GZ-HM200N

Published in Cameras

The JVC GZ-HM200As far as mid-range HD camcorders go, the JVC GZ-HM200 ($579 MSRP) is a solid product. The sister-model to the GZ-HD300, the HM200 includes dual SD/SDHC memory card slots and offers a fairly straightforward shooting experience. The camcorder has some handling issues—marred by cheap construction and a flimsy hand strap—but, overall, it's a good mid-range model from JVC.

The GZ-HM200 is available in blue, black, or red.

 

 

 

 

 

Xacti VPC-CA9

Published in Cameras

World’s First*1 Waterproof High-Definition Video Camera

Being waterproof down to 1.5 m (5 feet), the CA9 gives you the freedom to shoot the action in any weather and in any season.
The VPC-CA9 was awarded IPX8 certification (which requires the device to operate when fully submersed in water) based on JIS C 0920 waterproofing guidelines. Being waterproof down to 1.5 m (5 feet), the CA9 gives you the freedom to shoot the action in any weather and in any season, whether it’s a winter sport*2, a marine sport, or just a rainy day. Furthermore, it employs the advanced compression technology of MPEG-4 AVC/H.264, a video format that’s easy to handle on your PC and handy for web applications. The CA9 records high-definition 720p video in a waterproof body.
Easy to use, even for beginners Simple Mode
Settings on the CA9 are easy to understand, so even beginners can enjoy shooting.
Settings on the CA9 are easy to understand, so even beginners can enjoy shooting. In Simple mode, only the most basic elements are displayed on the LCD monitor.
Normal Mode: In Normal mode, you can fully utilize the camera’s functions.
Simple Mode: In Simple mode, the operational menus are easier to understand.
Effective zoom for video shooting Electronic Image Stabilizer
Original digital image stabilizer is capable of automatically distinguishing between unintended camera shaking and deliberate pans and tilts.
For beautiful high-definition video recording, the CA9 reduces the effect of the camera shake that typically occurs when you zoom in on a subject. SANYO’s original digital image stabilizer is capable of automatically distinguishing between unintended camera shaking and deliberate pans and tilts.
Newly developed engine delivers clear video images. 3D Digital Noise Reduction
The improved compression efficiency and bit-rate allocation results in a highly accurate video image.
To reduce random signal noise, the CA9 incorporates motion compensation into the noise-reduction process. The improved compression efficiency and bit-rate allocation results in a highly accurate video image.
Automatically follows faces, even when they move. Can follow the faces of up to 12 people. Face Chaser Function
The CA9 is able to detect your subjects’ faces instantly. Even if the faces move, the CA9 can follow them and adjust the focus and exposure to match your central subject. The Face Chaser function has been developed so that it can even follow faces from a side-on angle.
Note: Depending on the subject and shooting conditions, face detection may not operate as expected.
The Face Chaser function has been developed so that it can even follow faces from a side-on angle
Easily viewable rotating screen  285° Rotating, 2.5-Inch Wide-Screen LCD
Brightness on the VPC-CA9’s wide-screen LCD monitor can be adjusted to any of seven levels. Also, the monitor can rotate through approximately 285º, so you can easily position it at your preferred angle. This lets you keep your subject clearly in view, whether you’re shooting high, low, or at yourself.
The VPC-CA9’s wide-screen LCD monitor can be adjusted to any of seven levels.
Quick start to capture photo opportunities  1.6-Second Quick Start
The CA9 is always ready to shoot. Because it records onto a solid-state SD memory card—rather than HDD or DVD media with moving parts—you can start shooting immediately after opening the monitor.
You can start shooting immediately after opening the monitor.
Easy to save and play back on a PC MPEG-4 AVC/H.264
The CA9 employs advanced MPEG-4 AVC/H.264 video compression technology that makes it easy to save and play back files on a PC.
The CA9 employs advanced MPEG-4 AVC/H.264 video compression technology that makes it easy to save and play back files on a PC.
Cut and link HD video footage on the camera itself Easy Editing
The CA9 offers the convenience of editing HD videos on the camera itself. You can easily splice multiple clips into a single video, or cut unwanted footage. This feature is particularly useful when it comes to viewing slideshows and using your SD memory card capacity more effectively.
The CA9 offers the convenience of editing HD videos on the camera itself.
Select a mode to suit your needs A Variety of Video Shooting Modes
When you want to shoot images clearly in high definition HD-SHQWhen you want to record everyday scenes TV-HR, TV-SHQ
Long-time shooting and high-definition SD card recording 32 GB SDHC Memory Card Compatible
Compatibility with 32 GB SDHC memory cards means the CA9 can record high-definition video for approximately 7.5 hours.
Note: When the recording file size exceeds 4 GB, the file will be saved, and subsequent data will be saved in a new file. (A new file is automatically created every 4 GB. Although recording will continue until stopped by the user, recording of video clips and sound pauses when files are being saved.)
Record realistic sound Digital Stereo Recording
The CA9 uses semi-permeable material that allows sound, but not water, to pass through to the microphone and speaker parts, and thus keeps them waterproof. You can enjoy video shooting with stereo sound that brings to life both everyday and underwater scenes.
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HDR-XR550V

Published in Cameras

The good: Full manual feature set for video; geotagging for video is fun, if not very practical; autofocus system performs very well.

The bad: Annoying menu system; no wind filter or meaningful audio controls; relatively big and heavy; expensive; defaults to low resolution, not-full-HD video quality; cumbersome touch-screen interface.

The bottom line: The Sony Handycam HDR-XR550V fares well compared with the competition, though its video could be a bit sharper and the interface less cumbersome. Unless you absolutely need to store a lot of video on the camcorder--which I don't suggest--or have large hands and therefore could benefit from the extra grip the hard drive provides, the cheaper and nearly identical flash-based CX550V is a better deal.

Review:

Given its accouterments--a large G series lens, 240GB hard disk, 3.5-inch LCD and EVF, headphone and mic jacks, and shutter and iris controls--the Sony Handycam HDR-XR550V's price well north of $1,000 may be a bit painful, but not much of a surprise. One of Sony's two nearly identical high-end models for its prosumer line, the XR550V differs from its sibling, the CX550V, primarily with regard to its recording media and slightly different body design, the latter of which is due to its storage type (the XR550V has a hard drive whereas the CX550V has 64GB of built-in flash memory).

 

 


Sony Handycam HDR-CX300/CX350V Sony Handycam HDR-XR350V Sony Handycam HDR-CX550V Sony Handycam HDR-XR550V
Sensor 4-megapixel Exmor R CMOS 4-megapixel Exmor R CMOS 6-megapixel Exmor R CMOS 6-megapixel Exmor R CMOS
1/4 inch 1/4 inch 1/2.88 inch 1/2.88 inch
Lens
(with Active SteadyShot disabled)
12x
f1.8-3.4
29.8 - 357.6mm (16:9)
12x
f1.8-3.4
29.8 - 357.6mm (16:9)
10x
f1.8-3.4
29.8 - 298mm (16:9)
10x
f1.8-3.4
29.8 - 298mm (16:9)
Min illumination (lux) standard: 11
low light: 3
standard: 11
low light: 3
standard: 11
low light: 3
Night Shot (IR): 0
standard: 11
low light: 3
Night Shot (IR): 0

EVF

No No Yes
0.2 inch 201,000 pixel
Yes
0.2 inch, 201,000 pixel
LCD 2.7-inch 230,000-dot touch screen 2.7-inch 230,000-dot touch screen 3.5-inch 921,000-dot touch screen 3.5-inch 921,000-dot touch screen
Primary media 16GB/32GB flash; SDHC 160GB hard disk; SDHC 64GB flash; SDXC 240GB hard disk; SDXC
HD recording AVCHD:
1080/60i @ 24, 17 Mbps; 1,440x1,080/60i @ 9,5 Mbps
AVCHD:
1080/60i @ 24, 17 Mbps; 1,440x1,080/60i @ 9,5 Mbps
AVCHD:
1080/60i @ 24, 17 Mbps; 1,440x1,080/60i @ 9,5 Mbps
AVCHD:
1080/60i @ 24, 17 Mbps; 1,440x1,080/60i @ 9,5 Mbps
Manual shutter speed and iris No No Yes Yes
Accessory shoe Yes Yes Yes Yes
Audio 2 channels 2 channels 5.1 channels;
mic, headphone jacks
5.1 channels;
mic, headphone jacks
Body dimensions (WHD, inches) 2.1x2.6x5.0 2.4x2.8x4.5 2.6x3x5.8 2.9x3x5.8
Operating weight (ounces) 13.3 (est) 15.3 (est) 17 (est) 20
Mfr. Price $899.99 $999.99 $1,199.99 $1,249.99
Ship date February 2010 February 2010 February 2010 March 2010

Though Sony changed some of the controls, the camcorder's design is fundamentally the same as last year's models. The camcorder feels quite sturdy. And if you have larger hands, the hard disk's protrusion above the body gives you a little extra to grip. However, if you're looking for a slimmer and lighter model, check out the CX550V. All of the camcorder's door covers are solidly attached. The camcorder has a sliding door on top for the accessory shoe; another slider near the lens on the right side covering the mic and headphone jacks; two separate covers underneath the record button for the proprietary AV out and DC power in; and one inside the LCD hiding the Mini-HDMI and USB connectors. I don't like the location of the latter connectors, since I hate to leave the LCD open with cables running out of it. Also, its location makes it awkward to hold and move the camera around when you connect it to a TV. However, this seems to be a popular place for manufacturers' to stash the connectors.

At the front of the camcorder, you'll find a big-barreled lens with electronic lens cover and a flash on top--there's no built-in video light--as well as manual dial to the side. The manual control dial has long been a staple on Sony's top-end consumer models, but Sony expanded its capabilities a bit. Pressing the dial's center button toggles the operation to the currently selected option; holding the button in lets you select which manual function you'd like it to have. As for manual functions, the XR550V has options for focus, exposure, iris, shutter speed, autoexposure shift, and white balance shift. I've always liked the dial for its feel, but if you use the manual focus, shutter speed, and iris controls a lot, it gets annoying bouncing around the options with only the single control. However, this is how all of the prosumer models operate and is a trade-off for their relatively small sizes.

Toward the front-top of the unit is the five-channel mic; for the gazillionth time, I'll say I'd rather see Sony use that space for a stereo mic with good separation. In addition, though it has a mic input, the camcorder doesn't have any recording volume controls except for the reference level with two choices: Normal and Low.

The electronic viewfinder has a higher resolution than its predecessors had, as well as those on several of its competitors, but it is smaller. While EVFs are a disappearing breed and I find them essential no matter how bad, I'm disappointed with how small and low magnification the XR550V's is. That said, given the choice between size and resolution, I prefer the higher resolution.

The camcorder's large touch screen is relatively high resolution and nice to work with. It's also reasonably viewable in direct sunlight, but I still found it difficult to judge manual focus on it or in the EVF. Part of the problem is that there's neither focus assist--it doesn't magnify the subject on the LCD or in the viewfinder while using manual focus--nor peaking control to amplify the edge displays. Instead, the manual instructs you to zoom in, focus, and zoom out.

Under the LCD are buttons that trigger NightShot (infrared) and intelligent auto mode--a replacement for Easy--playback, and direct-to-DVD burning for use in conjunction with Sony's DVDirect dock or through software when connected to a PC. The GPS is switch controllable, and there's a manual power button in addition to the automatic operation when you pull out the EVF or open the LCD.

The camera's zoom switch falls directly under your right ring finger, which pushes the surprisingly small photo button to the very corner, where it's borderline difficult to feel. The zoom has a nice touch, and it's easy to maintain a steady rate. I complained about the location of the mode button--for switching between recording video and shooting still photos--in Sony's previous models, and now it sits just to the left of the EVF, a much better place and one that's easier to get to when you're shooting with the EVF.

Featured Cameras

  • Administrator HDC-TM300EC-K
    Written by Administrator
    HDC-TM300EC-K The TM300 has essentially the same optics and sensor as the HS300. There's a Leica Dicomar lens and a trio of 1/4.1in CMOS sensors, each with a gross 3.05-megapixels. So far, so similar. However, there are a few important differences. Previously, Panasonic has offered two options with its camcorders - SD models which use SDHC flash memory cards, and HS…
    Read 1915 times Read more...
  • Administrator GZ-HM200N
    Written by Administrator
    GZ-HM200N As far as mid-range HD camcorders go, the JVC GZ-HM200 ($579 MSRP) is a solid product. The sister-model to the GZ-HD300, the HM200 includes dual SD/SDHC memory card slots and offers a fairly straightforward shooting experience. The camcorder has some handling issues—marred by cheap construction and a flimsy hand strap—but, overall, it's a good mid-range model from JVC. The GZ-HM200…
    Read 1316 times Read more...